12.12.2008

When Winter Comes...



A superlative explanation of plant adaptation to winter can be found in the current New England Wildlfower Society newsletter. Penned by plantsman Bill Cullina, currently of the Coastal Maine Botanical Garden and formerly a stalwart hand at the New England Wildflower Society, this first installment of a two-part article examines what happens to plants when temperatures drop; part two, to appear soon, will shed light on how plants reawake in Spring. Bill's a New England guy, but with fast-growing national reputation, thanks to his frequent lectures and four excellent books, with a fifth on the way. BTW, the garden above is at the Hill-Stead, a historic home turned museum in Farmington, Ct. We're looking at its Sunken Garden, designed by Gertrude Jekyll.

8 comments:

flowergardengirl said...

I won't be a fan till the 6th book comes out...Really, how interesting that someone could write about what happens to plants when the temperature drops. I love that sort of info. Makes me feel like I'm privy to some secret of the earth;).

Philip Bewley said...

I also love this image. It shows that strong bones in the garden are needed when the landscape is so altered by snow.

MrBrownThumb said...

Nice picture, I agree with the comment above about the "bones" of a garden. Unfortunately I'm part of that group of gardeners that knows this but doesn't practice it. Right now my garden is pretty flat.

Philip Bewley said...

My brother has just moved to CT. Your garden and experience will be helpful to him there.I have sent him a link to your site.
Best,
Philip

Steve Silk said...

Flowergardengirl--Yes, it's cool geeky info for the hardcore set. I love to know about the inner workings of plants!

Steve Silk said...

Philip 1 and 2--Bones, yes-they are valuable even where there is no winter. But cold climate gardeners do have a better method of testing the effectiveness of their bones, thanks to a coating of snow.
Where in CT did your brother alight?

Steve Silk said...

Mr Brownthumb--You could add a few instant bones by including some piece of garden art--anything as simple as a neat-looking birdbath or some more sculptural, artistic element.

Philip Bewley said...

Hi,
He just bought a house in Rowayton. He moves into the house this saturday!
I have not been there, but the views of the water look wonderful.
He is from Mill Valley. We can practically garden all year, so snow will be something new!